Searching For Balance
collegehumor:

Our favorite new Tumblr.

collegehumor:

Our favorite new Tumblr.

dorkly:

Every Fighting Game

I’ve always wondered how you “crouch-forward” in real life.

currentsinbiology:

Scientists search for clues in sea star die-off

In their waterproof orange overalls, Hannah Perlkin and Emily Tucker look like commercial fishermen or storm-ready sailors. But they are biologists on their way to tide pools along a remote stretch of northern California coast. There they are searching for the cause of a mysterious and unprecedented die-off of sea stars along North America’s Pacific shores.The syndrome took marine scientists by surprise this summer, when sick and dying sea stars — also known as starfish — appeared in a host of locations between Alaska and southern California. Predatory species were the first to succumb, but now the mysterious ailment is appearing in species once thought to be resistant to its effects.
The progression is predictable: white lesions appear on an animal and become infected. Within hours or days the sea star becomes limp, and its arms may fall off. Necrosis eventually takes over and the animal dies.
“It’s like a zombie wasteland,” says Tucker, who is, like Perlkin, a field technician employed by the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). “You’ll see detached arms crawling away from their body.”

Nature - doi:10.1038/nature.2013.14370
A mysterious wasting disease is turning sea stars like Dermasterias imbricata into goo within hours of infection. Emily Tucker

currentsinbiology:

Scientists search for clues in sea star die-off

In their waterproof orange overalls, Hannah Perlkin and Emily Tucker look like commercial fishermen or storm-ready sailors. But they are biologists on their way to tide pools along a remote stretch of northern California coast. There they are searching for the cause of a mysterious and unprecedented die-off of sea stars along North America’s Pacific shores.The syndrome took marine scientists by surprise this summer, when sick and dying sea stars — also known as starfish — appeared in a host of locations between Alaska and southern California. Predatory species were the first to succumb, but now the mysterious ailment is appearing in species once thought to be resistant to its effects.

The progression is predictable: white lesions appear on an animal and become infected. Within hours or days the sea star becomes limp, and its arms may fall off. Necrosis eventually takes over and the animal dies.

“It’s like a zombie wasteland,” says Tucker, who is, like Perlkin, a field technician employed by the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). “You’ll see detached arms crawling away from their body.”

Nature - doi:10.1038/nature.2013.14370

A mysterious wasting disease is turning sea stars like Dermasterias imbricata into goo within hours of infection. Emily Tucker

distant-traveller:

Night with a roaring lady

Dancing aurora and moonbow (lunar rainbow) appears in a night photo of Lady Evelyn Falls near Mackenzie River in northern Canada.

Image credit & copyright: Yuichi Takasaka

distant-traveller:

Night with a roaring lady

Dancing aurora and moonbow (lunar rainbow) appears in a night photo of Lady Evelyn Falls near Mackenzie River in northern Canada.

Image credit & copyright: Yuichi Takasaka

distant-traveller:

Wood Buffalo autumn night

A moonlit night of early fall in the Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Canada. Aurora borealis appears in the sky below the Big Dipper stars. The World Heritage Site is also a Dark Sky Preserve. The park is the second-largest national park in the world where large herds of Wood Bison live.

Image credit & copyright: Yuichi Takasaka

distant-traveller:

Wood Buffalo autumn night

A moonlit night of early fall in the Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Canada. Aurora borealis appears in the sky below the Big Dipper stars. The World Heritage Site is also a Dark Sky Preserve. The park is the second-largest national park in the world where large herds of Wood Bison live.

Image credit & copyright: Yuichi Takasaka

woodendreams:

 (by Darrell Wyatt)
did-you-kno:

 Source
freshphotons:

Illustration shows a multivalent ion bridge between polymer brushes. Single ions are seen in between the two separate polymer surfaces forced out by the larger ions. The background image shows the polymer brushes not in contact and in the presence of multivalent ions when brought together the polymer brushes tangle up with the multivalent ions forcing the single valent ions out of the polymer brush area. When the two polymer brushes are pulled apart the multivalent ions stay attached to the polymer brushes forming a multivalent ionic bridge. Ryan Allen, Institute of Molecular Engineering, U of Chicago. Via.

freshphotons:

Illustration shows a multivalent ion bridge between polymer brushes. Single ions are seen in between the two separate polymer surfaces forced out by the larger ions. The background image shows the polymer brushes not in contact and in the presence of multivalent ions when brought together the polymer brushes tangle up with the multivalent ions forcing the single valent ions out of the polymer brush area. When the two polymer brushes are pulled apart the multivalent ions stay attached to the polymer brushes forming a multivalent ionic bridge. Ryan Allen, Institute of Molecular Engineering, U of Chicago. Via.

did-you-kno:

 Source
georgetakei:

From an Asian staffer. http://ift.tt/1bOKDA9

georgetakei:

From an Asian staffer. http://ift.tt/1bOKDA9